Architects of a New Dawn

We’d like to show the side of the world you don’t normally see on television.

Global Ecconomic Collapse or a shortage of Federal Reserve Notes? What do you think?

Will the world’s governments be able to save the global economy? Will the printing of so-called “money” enable them to stimulate a sustained economic recovery?
What is the cause of the threatened collapse of the global economic system? Why has the current system failed? Will a new and successful economic model emerge from the current economic crisis?
The global economy is going through a period of change and readjustment that has never been experienced before in history.

This article will outline the emergence of a new economic order, and the implications of what this will mean to the world.

(Send me an email and I will send you the article as it is far too long to post here.)

These are historic times. Events are now moving fast. For the people living in the English-speaking world, it will be a time of great suffering and sorrow. Many will starve through lack of food. Disease will be wide-spread – many will die. Law and order will break down – crime will become rampant. Eventually these countries will be taken over by their creditors, and their people put into slavery.
These events need not happen.
Greed is the #1 sin of humanity and is the main cause of this crisis. I have been inspired by the music of Santana to write a book about bringing Eden to Earth and what enlightenment can do.

www.Birthofanangel.com

Si toman un momento para ver con los ojos del corazon y no con la mente, veran que estamos rodiados, totalmente rodiados, de angeles.

If we take a moment to see with the eyes of our soul, not the mind, we will see that we are surrounded, totally surrounded, by angels.

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If you made some spaces between paragraphs more people might be able to actually read what you posted.
If we really are looking at total global economic collapse, I doubt that the outcome would be a better, global banking system of national banks.
I'm afraid that the present financial crisis may ironically be best for big capital interests in the long run and worst for the interests of fair trade, clean energy, environmental protection, and all the good stuff the global economy lacks.
What has happened is that the amount of venture capital has changed, but everything else has stayed the same. There are just as many homes, cars, factories, mines, oil wells etc, but the "market" believes them to be less worth, but there is nothing to indicate that once the bubble that broke is patched and blown up again it will be the same bubble, not a new and improved one. The reason we will patch the old bubble is that now we don't think we can afford the luxury of buying a new and better one ...
I recently read "The fall of the Roman Empire" it was uncanny as a contextual compare and contrast. As for the economic crisis, I cannot for see a "better economy" if it relies on a printing press and so many confused ideas in regard to wealth and sustainability that is in the best interest of all humanity and our planet.

So my suggestion would be to refine our personal service oriented bartering skills and learn to do more good with less goods and redefine our comfort zones.

I have moved 96 times since I began living on my own at 15. Every time I moved out or away, I gave everything I owned away to anyone who could use it. And every time I moved in and set up my next home, I magically would receive everything I needed in a similar "gifts in kind" or service exchange.

This is how my grandmother Rosa raised her 7 sons and 5 daughters alone and also how my grandfather Bastien raised his 15 children, when widowed shortly ofter the last baby boy took his wife's young life. Likewise, this is how my parents raised us 5 kids to help ourselves and our neighbors meet the most basic and essential human needs.

In this sense, our level of consciousness and concern for the community, as well as, our family and friends and strangers, in the economical view - always appeared to me as directly proportionate to a standard communal goal of survival, and a sustained sense of well being that would be manifested and propagated based on this old and sacred set of values and morals.

How well we were eating and how warm we were dressed was immediately interdependent on knowing our community and the services or products we were able to share with our friends and neighbors. We were never well off financially and I know that my dad worked hard and played hard from being a lumberer at age 12 and many other trades until the day he died. That is when my mother began working again in her early 40's. But we never felt poor and if anything we even felt as though we always had plenty and in this sense of "economy" we could "afford" to give and do more.

The printing press for the federal reserve is never going to be able to claim anything more than the value lost in forestry by making notes and burning them in equal proportions yearly. There are many appealing visions available to begin a reformation that sets the goals in line with the fact that we can take care of each other. A difficult concept to accept, yes, no doubt; but impossible to conceive or create, again I would argue that we can.

Yet, to me the question still remains in the arena of our ideals and mind set in the general populace: Can we change enough to out grow competitive markets and move into structures that value their interrelated reliance and connectivity and systemic functions, as a whole? If we can, then we can also necessarily find the ability to be self-propagating as a whole circuit, that is wired in series, first and parallel next.

This idea begs for simplicity first, complexity next, and complications treated only as an inconvenience, but not as part of the goal. Complexity is good, complication is part of a process and to be met as a challenge, handled appropriately the first time, with NO band-aids, i.e. quick fixes or speedy resolutions and reviewed for lessons learned. Ultimately complication is meant to be surpassed in the simplest way possible in view of the entire system or circuit and listed as an accomplishment met. Complexity is integral, where as complication, is not meant to be lasting and also not integral to the system's end state of functioning smoothly.

Only by following the systems approach or process, schematically, with compassion and wise discernment, can we hope to resolve such a large scale deviation of health and wealth and equality in the reasonable future. Each community would have to commit to the same level of responsibility and standardization in the beginning. By first conducting a proper assessment of load necessity, and appraising what is already laying about, but either not functioning, due to a state of disrepair, or simply not organized for proper use or utility and next, mapping the design of this circuit accordingly, to reconnect things, usefully, including the recycle and disposal aspects as one single loop system, assessing proper distribution and reconnecting the amount of needed energetic flow, where reserve energy is held in capacitance, [capacitors] and utilized in a need based release, that feeds and sustains the optimal function of the entire community, or circuit can it work better. Change is integral in this example. [And so is patience when reading a "nangent!"] I am sorry if I am hard to follow.

I know it sound Utopian, but in my mind, the problem in scope and from the big and long now perspective, is not economic but, more "communicomic" for lack of a better word, and of course entails forgetting everything we believe we know excluding the idea that "life is a pump." Just like the human heart, circulation is the best function for the longevity in the life of a pump; every pump needs to be completely taken apart and cleaned and reassembled at some point in it's life.

I think we need a rebuild that starts at the heart of the system. Us and our communified pumps; the heart of evolution is the desire to move on and grow and also, I believe, to enjoy the process. No one seems to be enjoying the process that is being discussed. This is just one of my crazy little ideas.
Nance
I started Boulderbarter@yahoogroups.com as well as denverbarter, so I agree with you. In my novel, Birthofanangel,
I describe the Utopian community of the future. Thank you for your thoughtful reply.

Blessings

Victor

nance said:

So my suggestion would be to refine our personal service oriented bartering skills and learn to do more good with less goods and redefine our comfort zones.



I think we need a rebuild that starts at the heart of the system. Us and our communified pumps; the heart of evolution is the desire to move on and grow and also, I believe, to enjoy the process. No one seems to be enjoying the process that is being discussed. This is just one of my crazy little ideas.
Hey! Another writer! Excellent! I am glad that you can appreciate one of my "crazy little ideas." Thank you for this encouraging response, I will try to find your book, as an avid reader given to Utopian themes, I am sure it will be a great read!! Love and Blessings to you as well. xx nance


Victor Forsythe said:
Nance
I started Boulderbarter@yahoogroups.com as well as denverbarter, so I agree with you. In my novel, Birthofanangel, I describe the Utopian community of the future. Thank you for your thoughtful reply.
Blessings

Victor

nance said:

So my suggestion would be to refine our personal service oriented bartering skills and learn to do more good with less goods and redefine our comfort zones.

I think we need a rebuild that starts at the heart of the system. Us and our communified pumps; the heart of evolution is the desire to move on and grow and also, I believe, to enjoy the process. No one seems to be enjoying the process that is being discussed. This is just one of my crazy little ideas.
I find the best analysis of all this by Catherine Austin Fitts. She's also involved in sustainable community building:

http://solari.com/
Hello, I just popped back here from the site you suggested - Thank You! I am fascinated!
Catherine said:
In the fall of 2001 I attended a private investment conference in London to give a paper, The Myth of the Rule of Law or How the Money Works: The Destruction of Hamilton Securities Group.

The presentation documented my experience with a Washington-Wall Street partnership that had:

* Engineered a fraudulent housing and debt bubble;
* Illegally shifted vast amounts of capital out of the U.S.;
* Used “privitization” as a form of piracy - a pretext to move government assets to private investors at below-market prices and then shift private liabilities back to government at no cost to the private liability holder.

I am certain to learn a lot from this site, again, thank you sincerely!
peace - xx nance

Candice Wilmore said:
I find the best analysis of all this by Catherine Austin Fitts. She's also involved in sustainable community building:

http://solari.com/

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